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Israel Working on Special Economic Relationship with China

PM Netanyahu and Chinese Pres. Xi Jinping. Photo courtesy of Haim Zach / GPO

Israel is seeking to be on an exclusive list—nations receiving investment from China. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, following his recent visit to China, noted in Sunday’s cabinet meeting that while China isn’t investing around the world right now, Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to consider that China have a specific investment policy for the Jewish State.

“China recently decided to restrict, to completely halt, its external investments for its own reasons – I am talking about the world, not Israel,” said Netanyahu in comments released by his office. “In light of my request, the President of China said that he was prepared to consider an exception for Israel, meaning that Chinese investments in the high-tech and other sectors would continue.” And that’s not the only special arrangement in the works between Israel and China. … Continue Reading

Joint Israeli-Palestinian Cancer Research Raises New Questions about Genes and Environment

February 19, 2017 Special Feature

Joint Israel and Palestinian medical research could teach more about cancer. Israeli MDA ambulance. Illustrative. By Joshua Spurlock

Israelis and Palestinians may be in the midst of a conflict dating back many decades, but they’re also working together to fight a different battle altogether—the fight against cancer. Joint research by Israelis and Palestinian professionals looked at Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) tumors in both Arab and Jewish populations and concluded that while some factors associated with NHL seem to be shared for the two groups that live in the same general geographic area, others were quite different. This raises a host of questions that could ultimately help better understand the impact of genetics and environment on cancer g.

It also offers opportunities for more joint work in the future, noted Professor Ora Paltiel, director of the Hebrew University-Hadassah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine. Prof. Paltiel, who led the research, said in a press release from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem on the effort that disease research has “the potential to improve and preserve human health, and it can also serve as a bridge to dialogue among nations.” … Continue Reading

Analysis—Trump to Really Reset Some Global Relations, Including with Israel

January 22, 2017 Special Feature

Will Trump be Israel’s best friend? U.S. Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (left) and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (right). Illustrative. Photo courtesy of Kobi Gideon (GPO)

United States President Donald J. Trump wasted no time in making it clear his foreign policy approach will differ from his predecessor, Barack Obama. Even before he officially took office, Trump was actively supporting Israel in the face of pressure from the United Nations and what ultimately turned into an almost unprecedented lack of support by the U.S. in Obama’s final days in office. And within hours of taking office, Trump was already symbolically reversing Obama’s view of one of America’s closest allies. Many are concerned or at least unclear as to what a Trump presidency will mean for the world. But for some nations, it looks to be a breath of fresh air. … Continue Reading

Analysis – Could Syria Bring Rivals Iran, Russia, and Turkey Together?

August 30, 2016 Special Feature
Could Syria's President bring together unlikely allies? Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (right) shakes hands with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left). Illustrative. Photo Courtesy of UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe.

Could Syria’s President bring together unlikely allies? Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (right) shakes hands with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left). Illustrative. Photo Courtesy of UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe.

The Syrian civil war has turned into a power vacuum pulling in fighters from all directions and many nations, with many of them fighting each other in which there are at least three or four sides in the conflict. Yet perhaps the most divisive mini-world war in recent memory may also be the stepping-stone that pulls three regional powers together ahead of the greatest battle of all time.

Iran, Turkey, and Russia have long held conflicting views. Turkey was once the Muslim darling of the West, and has been home to US missiles and strategic military facilities. That naturally put it at odds with Russia, who has battled the US off and on diplomatically, or even militarily, for 70 years. And Russia represents a secular superpower, while Iran is seeking to usher in an era of Islamic dominance, as Al-Monitor recently pointed out in a report on those two nations’ relationship. Yet despite the differences, one expert sees Syria as a place where they share interests—at the expense of the United States. … Continue Reading

Opinion—Syria May Be the Melting Pot of Trouble, But Focus Is Key

July 5, 2015 In Depth, Special Feature, Syria
Regional fight? The battle with ISIS is across the Middle East and growing hotter. Middle East educational sign post showing distance between major locations. Illustrative. By Joshua Spurlock

Regional fight? The battle with ISIS is across the Middle East and growing hotter. Middle East educational sign post showing distance between major locations. Illustrative. By Joshua Spurlock

Syria is so bad the bad guys are fighting worse guys and now not everyone on the “good side” is happy even when the good guys have success against the bad guys. It’s a hodge-podge of turmoil and terror, impacting virtually the entire region. It’s not just that three or four other nations are touched—the bigger question is who’s not?

Here’s a rundown of some of the biggest trouble in Syria, and why it shouldn’t distract from the bigger goal of defeating ISIS. … Continue Reading

Opinion: Iran Nuke Deal at Best A 15-Year Ceasefire

No deal is better than this deal with Iran. Photo Courtesy of UN Photo/Evan Schneider

Can Iran be trusted? Or is it talk now, fight later? Photo Courtesy of UN Photo/Evan Schneider

The framework agreement reached last week between the major world powers and Iran over the latter’s nuclear program has been hailed by US President Barack Obama as preventing Iran from developing a nuclear weapon. To some degree, he is correct—for now. But key fine-print in the deal unfortunately paints a picture in which the world leaders have obtained today’s peace in exchange for tomorrow’s warfare. And it could prove to be worse than ever.

Hailed by the world powers as “historic”, the Iran nuke deal instead recalls a historic mistake—the Versailles treaty that ended World War I. The leader of the Allied Armies, Ferdinand Foch—according to About.com—believed the treaty didn’t properly prevent Germany from starting a new war. He famously said of the deal, “This is not peace. It is an armistice for 20 years.” World War II started almost exactly 20 years later.

And so it is for this Iran agreement if it is finalized as it appears today—it’s not peace, it’s a 15-year ceasefire at best. Here’s why. … Continue Reading

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